Diocese of Southern Virginia

 

The Episcopal Church in Southern Virginia began four centuries ago in 1607. On April 26 of that year, the colonists sent from England paused on their way into the Chesapeake Bay for fresh water and a view of their new land. The Reverend Robert Hunt, spiritual advisor to the settlers, brought ashore near Cape Henry a cross which he implanted in a sand dune and proclaimed England’s unique brand of Christianity to the official faith of the new colony.

The Episcopal Church in America, although an independent entity, is still part of the worldwide Anglican Communion. These historic ties, however, were recently threatened. The reformed Episcopal Church broke away from the main body in 1873.

The present size and shape of the diocese dates from 1892, when it was carved out of the Diocese of Virginia, and from 1919, when the Diocese of Southwestern Virginia was formed from its western counties.

The church accepted the ordination of women in 1976.

In 1988, the church elected its first woman bishop.

In 1998, the Anglican Communion, including the Episcopalian representatives, approved a resolution "rejecting homosexual practice as incompatible with Scripture. These steps generated controversy within the church as well as among other churches of the Anglican Communion. 

"However, in July of 2003 the Episcopal Dioceses of New Hampshire voted in their general convention to elect a gay bishop. The Reverend V. Gene Robinson is a divorced father of two grown children who has been living faithfully in openness with his male partner for thirteen years. This election represent the first time that a church claiming apostolic succession has elected an openly gay bishop. In response, conservatives in both the Anglican an Episcopalian denominations have threatened to break fellowship, but in June 2008 Grace Episcopal changed it's name to Grace Angelican.

Today, the diocese contains 119 congregations in nine convocations with approximately 37,000 communicants. It stretches from the Atlantic Ocean more than 200 miles westward to Appomattox and from the south side to the James River at Richmond to the North Carolina border. It includes the metropolitan areas of Tidewater and Greater Richmond with congregations in excess of 1,500 members to vast rural areas with dozens of churches of less than 100 parishioners.

It includes the 300-year-old College of William and Mary, which was founded as a Church of England university in 1693, and Saint Paul’s College (1888), one of the oldest African-American colleges in America still affiliated with the Episcopal Church.

 

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Proverbs 11:17 says, "Your own soul is nourished when you are kind."

Proverbs 3:27 says, "Do not withhold good when it is in your power to act."

Be kind to those you meet, you might be amazed at what God will do with a simple act of kindness!

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Prayer is at the heart of every congregation within the Episcopal Church.

Prayer,

formal or informal,

individual or in a group,

said silently or aloud

is the lifeblood of our souls and bodies. 

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All Saints in Virginia Beach, Virginia give monetary donations made through their Outreach Commission's Budget.

 

Bethia United Methodist Churh in Chesterfield, VA - This year, all proceeds will be split between the Jackson-Field Home for Girls & the fund for the four Bethia members of the Old Mutare Hospital, Zimbabwe Mission Trip

 

Emmanuel Episcopal Church in Hampton, Virginia has their EYC (Episcopal Youth Ministry) group meet regularly for activities that include outreach programs such as visiting Jackson-Feild Home.  Their youth represent God's hope for the future. They strongly believe that the experience of youth guides one's later years. Because of this, it is the aim of their parish to involve all youth and adults in their youth ministry.

 

First United Methodist Church of Hopewell, VA. Nov. 7th, 2010 “Fall Day Apart” at the Lawrenceville UMC. This begins at 3 p.m. so we will be leaving the church at 1:15 p.m. if you wish to carpool. Were asked to bring unwrapped gifts for the residents of Jackson Feild Home for girls. Needed are personal care items, clothing for girls around the ages of 12 – 18, craft supplies, gift cards, etc. 

 

Grace Episcopal Church in Purdy, Virginia. On July 1, 1920, the official “Episcopal Home for Girls” was opened in a house built for a Rectory by Grace Church, but never occupied by the children. Grace Church became the final resting place for the descendants of the Wyatt and Feild families. Mr. Marshall, who was the first Superintendant of Jackson-Feild Episcopal Home was laid to rest here too. Grace Church was the house of worship that all the home girls went to each Sunday. Rev. George Joel Smith who was the rector of the girls' home during 1966 to 1975 gave his sermons there. With the changes in the early 70's the girls were able to go to different churches in Emporia depending upon their denominations; but most chose to still attend Grace Church. A great number of the older girls were baptized and did their communion at Grace Church, so it seemed the likely place to go revisit. In addition, since we have limited access to Jackson-Feild, due to all the changes and mandates that have taken place since becoming Jackson-Feild Homes, Grace Church has graciously allowed us to hold some of our annual homecomings in their Parish Hall.  

Manakin Episcopal Church in Midlothian, VA generously makes donations to Jackson-Feild. They are a place where persons of all ages are honored and seen to be full members of the Body of Christ. It is said, "Our Lord was emphatic that children were to be at the center of things in his vision of the world".

 

Pohick Episcopal Church in Lorton, VA generously supports Marshall Cottage at Jackson-Feild Homes.

 

St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Newport News, VA has Circle 1 and Circle 2 that focuses on Outreach programs with prayer and devotion. They are the "Fishers of Women" and provide ways to identify with others less fortunate and make Jackson-Feild Homes a beneficiary of their offerings.

 

St. Christopher's Episcopal Church in Portsmouth, Virginia has the Episcopal Church Women's (ECW) annual Red Door Sales. The outreach ministry includes Jackson-Feild Home and benefits the community with low cost clothing and other articles. 

 

St. Francis Episcopal Church, located in Great Falls, Virginia has an Outreach Committee that promotes specific outreach projects in their community, their city, and the world. The committee makes grants to worthy projects, facilitates parishioner involvement in outreach projects, screens requests for help, and mobilizes an appropriate response. Through the "Care for Children and Youth", this group seeks to care for children and youth in crisis or need. One of their many Ministry partners includes the Jackson- Feild Home for Girls.

 

St. James Episcopal Church in Leesburg, VA had a Middle School Mission that has assisted Jackson-Feild with their landscape and horticulture project in the past. 

 

St. John's Episcopal Church in Hampton, Virginia contributes annually through their Mission and Outreach Commissions for their congregation to help people in need in their community and the world. From these funds they contribute to Jackson-Feild Homes. Lallie Beverly Darden b. 1875 d. 1962 is buried there.

 

St. John's Episcopal Church in Hopewell, Virginia visits Jackson-Feild Homes.
 

St. Paul's Episcopal Church located in Petersburg, Virginia is still affiliated with the Episcopal Church as well as Jackson-Feild Home located in Jarratt which provides services needed by troubled youth.

 

St. Matthias Episcopal Church in Midlothian, Virginia has the Next Step Mission Fund. All Next Step monies go into a restricted fund that can be used for nothing else. Every penny pledged goes straight into the community to help those in need. The members of the Outreach Commission establish the Next Step budget for each year. Input is then requested from the congregation and preference is given to those organizations in which their members are involved. Jackson-Feild is one of the organizations that benefit from their generosity.

 

The "United Methothist Women" one of their purposes is  to develop as createive supportive fellowship and to expand concepts of mission through participation in the Global ministires of the church. They have an representative from Jackson-Field Home for Girls located in Jarratt, Virginia present the program. (9-28-09) 

 

The Episcopal Church - The Episcopal Diocese of Southwestern VIrginia Welcomes You - Prayer Calendar http://episcopalchurch.org/index.htm

 

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